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Here is your 1 search result for Tours, Attractions & Activities in Limoges, France

Open visit to the Limoges porcelain museum - Musée National Adrien Dubouché

Open visit to the Limoges porcelain museum - Musée National Adrien Dubouché - Limoges, France

Duration: 60 to 90 minutes
Location: Limoges, France

From USD
$7.82

Self-guided tour

Book your tickets in advance so you can save some time on the spot.

Discover the largest public collection of Limoges porcelain in the world ... More info ›

Self-guided tour

Book your tickets in advance so you can save some time on the spot.

Discover the largest public collection of Limoges porcelain in the world.

Visit: Musee National Adrien Dubouche, 8 B Place Winston Churchill, 87000 Limoges France

The Musée National Adrien Dubouché houses the largest public collection of Limoges porcelain in the world. Further to this, the museum also displays 18,000 pieces that catalogue the history of ceramics from Antiquity to the modern day. As such, the museum is not only dedicated to promoting the international renown of Limoges’ porcelain manufacturers, but also to celebrating the ceramic art form as a whole.

Behind the doors of its Italian façade, the museum also offers a wealth of architecture to marvel at – the building itself was designated a historical landmark in 1992. Visits to the museum take visitors through four distinct spaces: the old classrooms of the École d’arts décoratifs (which shared the building with the museum), the old museum’s “Art Nouveau” halls from 1900, the porcelain & ceramic-making techniques room, and the halls dedicated to the finest porcelain artworks.

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